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Anti-Racism Week is Launched #TakeOnRacism

Written by: diannem

The Anti-Racism Network South Africa (ARNSA) calls on all sectors of society to support Anti-Racism Week 2017, which launches today, and runs until Human Rights Day on the 21st.

The concept of ‘BEcoming’ will feature during Anti-Racism Week (March 14-21), with key ‘be’ themes per day. The type of events that you/ your organisations could host can be linked to the themes.

Now in it's second year, we spoke with Sean Moodley, ARNSA's national coordinator, to find out more about ARNSA and what we can all do to be getting involved in the call to #TakeOnRacism during Anti-Racism week:

"ARNSA has created a platform and the platform is Anti-Racism week. Where we are calling on all South Africans to come together this week, and not only South Africans but all people who live in this country."

Sean Moodley, ARNSA's National Coordinator

"How do we begin to collectively deal and talk with this thing called racism, speak out against it, how do we learn about it and if we get a bit desperate how do we act upon the issue of racial incidents within our country."

Sean Moodley, ARNSA's National Coordinator

"I think that the majority of South Africans within our country would love to build this country, and how do we deal with people that don't see that."

Sean Moodley, ARNSA's National Coordinator

"The first thing we want to do this week is we want to learn what racism is...the second thing is when we learn about it, then we look at the idea of how do we speak out against it."

Sean Moodley, ARNSA's National Coordinator

You can participate in the week by creating your own event, or by following Anti-Racism Network on Facebook or Twitter to find events in your community!

14 March, Tuesday – Be Aware This day is about making people aware about what racism is, the different ways it manifests itself and just how pervasive it is. It is about being aware of how racism affects people in their interpersonal relationships, in their social standing, in the workplace, in faith-based organisations, at school or on the sports field, in the news, and on social media. The day is about being aware of how racism affects us materially and on a structural level.

15 March, Wednesday - Be Frank This day aims to address the complexities of daily lives, racial identities and racism in South Africa. Possible sub themes include: white guilt and privilege, black racism and prejudice, blackness and its meaning today, can white/ Indian people be African without cultural appropriation, ‘coloured’ identity and its meaning in a post-apartheid setting, why are we silent when we are faced with racism, what is the insidious language that supports/underpins racism, non-racialism and its meaning in post-apartheid South Africa.

16 March, Thursday – Be Challenged This day prompts you to challenge your own stereotypes and prejudices, to do something that you wouldn’t normally do. Identify what stereotypes / prejudices you hold of your race and of other races. Brainstorm ways to challenge the stereotypes / prejudices that have been identified. Actively perform challenges and share it on social media.

17 March, Friday – Be Conscious Consciousness Friday encourages activities and public events that offers a space to listen and discuss race and racism through creative platforms.

18 March, Saturday – Be Brave Saturday’s theme is to speak out against racism. It provides a space for listening to how people have been brave enough to take on racism, and for people to share strategies for dealing with racism in everyday life.

19 March, Sunday – Be Just The theme for being just focuses on sharing knowledge and resources outside of the usual spaces, with a particular focus on holding events either in the urban peripheries or rural areas. Issues could include spatial justice, the Hate Speech Bill, rights and laws, media and racism – advertising etc and reconciliation, restitution and land distribution.

20 March, Monday – Be Free Consider the ideals of freedom, liberation history, constitutionalism and race. This can also be a day of reflection.

21 March, Tuesday – Become The last day of the campaign falls on Human Rights Day and the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. It lends itself to collaboration with Human Rights organisations. Themes can be centred around human rights, dignity, respect or history, with specific focus on the Sharpeville Massacre which occurred on this day in 1960.

Don't forget to share pictures, activities and tweets to ARNSA @AntiRacismNet

#TakeOnRacism



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